1. Apples Are Nutritious

A medium apple — with a diameter of about 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) — equals 1.5 cups of fruit. Two cups of fruit daily are recommended on a 2,000-calorie diet.

One medium apple — 6.4 ounces or 182 grams — offers the following nutrients (1Trusted Source):

  • Calories: 95
  • Carbs: 25 grams
  • Fiber: 4 grams
  • Vitamin C: 14% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI)
  • Potassium: 6% of the RDI
  • Vitamin K: 5% of the RDI

What’s more, the same serving provides 2–4% of the RDI for manganese, copper, and the vitamins A, E, B1, B2, and B6.

Apples are also a rich source of polyphenols. While nutrition labels don’t list these plant compounds, they’re likely responsible for many of the health benefits.

To get the most out of apples, leave the skin on — it contains half of the fiber and many of the polyphenols.

2. Apples May Be Good for Weight Loss

Apples are high in fiber and water — two qualities that make them filling.

In one study, people who ate apple slices before a meal felt fuller than those who consumed applesauce, apple juice, or no apple products (2Trusted Source).

In the same study, those who started their meal with apple slices also ate an average of 200 fewer calories than those who didn’t (2Trusted Source).

In another 10-week study in 50 overweight women, participants who ate apples lost an average of 2 pounds (1 kg) and ate fewer calories overall, compared to those who ate oat cookies with a similar calorie and fiber content (3Trusted Source).

Researchers think that apples are more filling because they’re less energy-dense, yet still deliver fiber and volume.

Furthermore, some natural compounds in them may promote weight loss.

A study in obese mice found that those given a supplement of ground apples and apple juice concentrate lost more weight and had lower levels of “bad” LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol than the control group

3. Apples May Be Good for Your Heart

Apples have been linked to a lower risk of heart disease (5Trusted Source).

One reason may be that apples contain soluble fiber — the kind that can help lower your blood cholesterol levels.

They also contain polyphenols, which have antioxidant effects. Many of these are concentrated in the peel.

One of these polyphenols is the flavonoid epicatechin, which may lower blood pressure.

An analysis of studies found that high intakes of flavonoids were linked to a 20% lower risk of stroke (6Trusted Source).

Flavonoids can help prevent heart disease by lowering blood pressure, reducing “bad” LDL oxidation, and acting as antioxidants (7Trusted Source).

Another study comparing the effects of eating an apple a day to taking statins — a class of drugs known to lower cholesterol — concluded that apples would be almost as effective at reducing death from heart disease as the drugs (8Trusted Source).

However, since this was not a controlled trial, findings must be taken with a grain of salt.

Another study linked consuming white-fleshed fruits and vegetables, such as apples and pears, to a reduced risk of stroke. For every 25 grams — about 1/5 cup of apple slices — consumed, the risk of stroke decreased by 9% (9Trusted Source).